2008-10-15

My Special Little Girl


You've seen photos of my youngest daughter Michelle on this blog doing things all kids in the country would do. Playing with calves and animals and growing up healthy and happy. Looking at her you wouldn't guess Michelle has autism. Well she has. I watched a movie the other night called "My extraordinary Life" I think that's what it was called. It was about a Mum in the US raising twin sons both with Autism. Like me she persisted in ensuring her two kids got the best possible start and help in life. Michelle has progressed from a severely disabled (she had a badly turned in leg) situation with her physical and mental development. At four she couldn't speak. At five her first few words were Dada and cat and she was barely toilet trained. I resolved right from the beginning when she was diagnosed at three with ASD (Autistic Spectrum Disorder) to help Michelle gain the skills she would need to lead a normal happy life. Now she is nearly ten, riding bikes, playing with calves, climbing trees and doing everything other kids her own age do. I am so lucky to have her and Inaya. Hope you like the photo I took of Michelle today with her now rather large calf club calf Starlight. I am so proud of my special kid.

7 comments:

  1. What an adorable picture! I worked as a special needs aide for 4 years, and of all the children I had a special love for the autistic kiddos. I dont know why them in particular, maybe the challenge of getting through...or the innocent light in their eyes....or just the special little people they are, but I had a way working with them and they loved me (not bragging) and I loved them so much in return. After 2 years of leaving the school I still think often about a few that stole my heart and wonder how they are how they have progressed. From severly autistic to one little doll how has Asd like your youngest. I sure do miss them...miss working with them....you have accomplished a lot, worked like you have, worked with your daughter to overcome her autisim - which is challenging, heartbreaking at times, and time consuming- and do your art, and other children, not to mention the farm...I honestly dont know how you do it, except that God will never give us more than we can handle....I'm in awe of you...your as special as your daughter....definately a survivor and a good mom! My hats off to you! Keep up the good work!

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  2. Wonderful photo. I spent a lot of my teaching life amongst special needs - some of the years with autistic children - and it is amazing what love and a "normal" life style can do. I am so pleased to see your girls looking so well and happy.

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  3. Michelle at times has her moments. Her therapist has to remind her at times that older sister now needs her space. Three months ago Michelle wouldn't go near the calves now after attending calf club she has completely changed. Anne my firned in Paparoa has done wonders for her and the other kids she has helped. I'm just a very persistant person. No is not an answer. We have ASD all through our family so it's not something that was new to me. Farm,kids,fulltime job - gosh I'm getting tired all ready!!!! Thanks for such great comments. I let Michelle read my post and she was so delighted.We're going to make gardens one for Mum,one for Inaya and one for Michelle. Should be heaps of fun.

    Rae I have the same admiration for you as well

    Weaver of Grass - You are so right. Normality works, that and constant repetition and putting kids in the "deep end" so to speak. It worked for Michelle but I needed ear plugs sometimes - you would know what I am getting at. The girls are happy and thriving -so am I.

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  4. She's awesome! As you know my oldest had autism/aspergers too and even now there are faint outlines of it you can just make out. Michelle has come a long way!

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  5. Amy she has had a battle to get there but when I see her thriving and having such a great friendship with your gorgeous daughter I can really sit back and smile. Michelle has done so well - sometimes it's hard to believe she has autism at all.

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  6. Good to hear you had a positive outcome with your daughter. Living in the country would be of great benefit I'm sure.

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  7. Definitely. I think the kids are far better off and have more to look forward to than just a small backyard and a concrete foot path. We're so lucky we have such a great school for the kids to go to.

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