2008-10-20

Get out of It!!!!


Mama Turkey was not pleased to be disturbed when she had some serious egg sitting to do. This hen was nesting in one of our paddocks. The chicks didn't survive the onslaught of hawks and stoats. We have heaps of them roaming around across the neighbouring farms. Last hunting season the boys next door blasted away over fifty of these big birds. Rule is if you want to eat Turkey shoot them in a month without an 'R" in it otherwise their flesh tastes like the crickets and snails they eat - yuk! Turkey's were imported in the 1800's by the local settlers to control caterpillars eating their crops. The caterpillars lost out but not the turkeys. No spring is here the turkey's are back together for the breeding season. We won't be having Turkey for Christmas Dinner - much as I'd love to. We'll see about next year maybe

6 comments:

  1. I have seen wild turkeys in Arizona madbush - I must say they look rather skinny. Here in UK we sometimes eat goose but the wild geese are said to be too tough and skinny - so perhaps the same is true of wild versus domesticated turkeys. I suppose wild turkeys do so much walking about that their leg muscles get tough.

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  2. We tried wild turkey once, have to say we didn't know about the R rule then and I'm not sure which month it was, but in any case it was as tough as old boots - regrettably because it seems a shame when there are so many of them to eat! Not sure I'd be keen to try again but then again I said that of goat and now enjoy it, all depends on the age of the bird/goat, how it is prepared and cooked (also that R rule I guess must be true!).

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  3. Amy - Yes but not any of the ones from here. Years ago Dave and I were way up in the black blocks of Northland literally in the middle of nowhere. We shot about twenty of them did the horrible part of gutting and defeathering and they tasted really nice. Because we shot them all in July a month without an r in it!. My family were well supplied that year with turkeys for Christmas.

    Weaver of Grass - I shot a Canada Goose one year (when I was right into duck shooting that is)The only part that was useful was the breast meat. I made a really nice dish out of it too with orange sauce and herbs. I'll have to find the recipe and post it up for those who are into game dishes. I checked my NZ Bird and sure enough the Turkeys we have here are from North America. I think some of those into keenly hunting Tom Turkeys would have a field day over here in Northland. The local Farmers would love them for it! Have to be in a month without an R in it of course.

    Cabbage Tree Farm - Bridget avoid eating any turkey shot in a month with an R in it. Otherwise swipe a whole lot of turkey eggs and put a broody hen on them ,then raise the chicks for the freezer. Don't do what I did and get soft then end up raising a baby turkey that became both guard dog,a doorbell and pet. Not a good idea. I will have to post up some recipes for Turkey now. Stick to the R rule and I guarantee the bird you get will taste a lot nicer!

    Great to hear from you guys
    Liz

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  4. The 'R' rule is very interesting. I've never had turkey but some friends often eat them. Gotta tell them about this rule. Have a nice weekend. You guys are so fortunate to be living in a farm, enjoying the offerings of nature!

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  5. Hi Cats,

    Southern Hemisphere it would apply depending on the location.Now I have to think about it!!! Turkey's also eat grasses etc as far as I am aware. But crickets and snails seem to get consumed throughout the spring and summer seasons. So if its Northern Hemisphere - very late autumn on would be the best option - I hope!!!

    Liz

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